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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA’s) medical services and first aid regulation, 29 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 1910.151(b) states, "In the absence of an infirmary, clinic, or hospital in near proximity to the workplace which is used for the treatment of all injured employees, a person or persons shall be adequately trained to render first aid. Adequate first aid supplies shall be readily available."

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and International Safety Equipment Association (ISEA) American National Standard – Minimum Requirements for Workplace First Aid Kits and Supplies (ANSI/ISEA Z308.1-2015) establishes minimum performance requirements for first aid kits and their supplies. First aid kits are classified based on the assortment and quantity of first aid supplies intended to deal with most types of injuries and sudden illnesses that may be encountered in the workplace. These may include major and minor wounds; minor burns; sprains and strains; and eye injuries. As each work environment is unique, it is expected that the contents of each kit will be supplemented as needed based upon the recommendations of a person competent in first aid.

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Ladder Safety--Always important no matter the height
by Jim Ruggiero, EDiS

There are many different types and style of ladders; so which one is best for your project?  Using a ladder can be very dangerous. 

Fatal falls, slips, or trips took the lives of 668 workers in 2012, down slightly from 2011. In an August 22, 2013 the Bureau Labor of Statistics (BLS) for the U.S. Department of Labor reported:  falls to a lower level accounted for 544 or about 81 percent of fatalities. In 2012, the height of the fall was reported in 437 of the fatal falls to a lower level. Of those cases, about one in four occurred after a fall of less than 10 feet. Most projects around the house and on job sites are conducted from ladders at less than 10 feet.  Changing a light bulb, painting, trim work, putting up Christmas lights, etc… are examples of work being performed at a level less than 10 feet.

Most ladders have safe use information attached to the side of the ladder. It is extremely important to read and follow manufactures safe use information. Most people do not realize all ladders have weight limits. Your typical household ladder is considered a light duty ladder; this ladder is usually rated for up to 200lbs. Be aware that standing on the top rungs of the ladder will cause the ladder to become unstable and usually results in a fall with injuries or death, remember most fatalities occur when using a ladder less than 10 feet from the ground. Ladders are not toys, please do not let children climb a ladder, it is difficult enough for trained workers to use a ladder in ideal conditions. 

Take into consideration the project you plan to accomplish. Don't ever use a metal ladder near live wires or parts. Would you use an aluminum ladder to work on electrical equipment? Not a good idea. It will only take a few minutes to read the manufactures information. That few minutes can literally save your life. 

Here are a few tips to address before you use a ladder; choose the right size ladder; always inspect the ladder before use, do not use if the ladder is damaged; check the weight limit; ask someone to assist you when you are on the ladder; don’t be in a hurry, when setting up a ladder, make sure the footing is level and the ladder is stable; While working on a ladder, don't try to reach out too far, but move the ladder to a better working position. Take one step at a time, and hold on with at least one hand.

Have you thought of all of these things? There is much more to consider, review your task, take appropriate safety precautions, and if you’re not comfortable or unsure, always ask for help.  

How to read your tire
by Marie Wright, Worth & Company

The sidewall of your tire is filled with important information that tells you everything you need to know about your tire. The numbers can be a bit overwhelming to the untrained eye, so the best way to understand tire markings is to take an example and break it down, bit by bit.


For our example, these numbers are:
 
P215/65R 15 95H
 
(P) Service Description
The service description may not always appear on the tire, but it is important to know how it can affect your vehicle. If there is a "P" on the sidewall, it stands for "passenger car." This refers to the U.S. (P-metric) method of tire sizing. "LT" stands for Light Truck. "ST" is for "Special Trailer." And "T" stands for "Temporary," which is primarily used for small spare tires. If a tire does not have a "P" or another letter in front of the numbers, it is considered a "Euro-metric" tire. A Euro Metric tire conforms to the European tire specifications, and often carries a different load index than a comparably sized P-metric tire.
 
(215) Tire Width
The first number in this series refers to the tire's section width, or distance from sidewall edge to sidewall edge (in millimeters) when measured up and over the tire's tread. Generally speaking, the larger this number is, the wider the tire will be.
 
(65) Aspect Ratio
This number is the tire's aspect ratio, or its section height compared to its section width. In this example, the section (or sidewall) height is 65 percent of the section width. This number can be very indicative of a tire's purpose. Lower numbers, like 55 or less, mean a short sidewall for improved steering response and better overall handling.
 
(R) Internal Construction
The "R" refers to radial construction, which has been the industry standard in passenger-car tires for more than 20 years. Prior to radial tires, most cars came with bias-ply tires, which had a crude construction that made for poor handling. Bias-ply tires (which use a "B" for their description) are still used for certain truck applications.
 
(15) Rim Diameter
This is the rim — or wheel — diameter, in inches, for which the tire was sized. Pay particular attention to this number if you plan on upgrading your wheel size. If your wheel diameter changes, you'll have to purchase a new set of tires that matches this new diameter.
 
(95) Load Index
A tire's load index is a measurement of how much weight each tire is designed to support.  The larger the number, the higher the load capacity.  This is one of the most important numbers on your tire. To find out what "95" means, it must be looked up on a Load-Carrying Capacity per Tire chart.  In this case, 95 indicates a maximum weight of 1,521 pounds. Remember that this is per tire, which means you have to multiply by four to get the total capacity for a complete set of tires. If the vehicle has its original tires, you can just refer to the doorjamb, which lists the maximum cargo capacity with passengers.
 
Some vehicles are equipped with "XL" tires. No, it doesn't mean that they are extra-large but it does mean that they are extra-load tires. The load index on these tires is much higher than a standard-load tire — which is why it is important to replace an XL tire with another XL tire.
 
Remember "P-metric" and "Euro-metric sizing"? Their difference in load rating can lead to confusion and potential trouble. For a given size, P-metric tires will have a load index that is one or two points lower than corresponding Euro-metric tires. So if your car came with Euro-metric tires, don't replace them with P-metric tires. You can, however, replace P-metric tires with equivalent-size Euro-metric ones because you gain load capacity that way.
 
Why is this important? Generally speaking, you don't want your replacement tires to have a lower load index number than the originals (as indicated by the driver's doorjamb or the owner's manual), particularly with high capacity vehicles that ride on smallish tires, such as minivans.
 
Also, and contrary to popular perception, optional large-diameter wheels with lower-profile tires tend to have less load-carrying capacity because they contain less air. And it is the volume of air inside the tire, not the rubber itself or the wheel material that shoulders the load. The load index is especially important when shopping for a tire online, since many retailers do not specify whether a tire is P-metric or not.
 
(H) Speed Rating
The speed rating is a measurement of the speed at which the tire is designed to run for extended periods. An "H" speed rating signifies that this tire can be run safely at speeds of up to 130 mph for extended periods. Will it explode if it goes to 140? No, not immediately. But it might if it is run at that speed for an extended time.
 
Here is a complete list of the various tire speed ratings, and their associated letters:
S 112 mph
T 118 mph
U 124 mph
H 130 mph
V 149 mph
*Z Over 149 mph
*W 168 mph
*Y 186 mph
*(Y) Over 186 mph
 
*The "Z" rating used to be the highest rating for tires having a maximum speed capability greater than 149 mph, but as tire technology improved, it is was ultimately split into the "W" and "Y" rating. A "ZR" may sometimes appear in the size designation, as a sort of nod to the prior rating, but it will also be used in conjunction with a W or a Y.
 
Additional Information on Your Tires
 
DOT Code
 
The DOT code is used by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to track tire production for recall purposes. If a tire proves to be defective, this number helps keep track of where these tires ended up so that buyers can be notified of the problem. At the end of the DOT code you'll find a four-digit number. This is the manufacturing date of the tire. The first two digits stand for the week; the other two are the year. For example, if your tire had "1610" listed, it was manufactured on the 16th week of 2010.
 
If you come across a three-digit number, you have a tire that was manufactured before 2000. A DOT tire code of "127" indicates the tire was made on the 12th week of the seventh year of the decade. But it's difficult to know whether that was 1997 or even 1987. According to tirerack.com, some tires produced in the 1990s may have a small triangle following the DOT number to identify the decade. But any tire that has a three-digit code is history.  Tire experts recommend that tires that are six or more years old be replaced, regardless of tread depth.
 
Sometimes the DOT number will be located on the inside of the tire. In this case, you can either jack up the car to inspect it, or check with your local mechanic or tire shop. You should also make a habit of checking the manufacturing date on your spare tire as well.
 
Maximum Air Pressure
This number refers to the maximum amount of air you can put in a tire before you harm it. It is not the recommended tire pressure; that number can be found in your owner's manual and on the doorjamb.
 
Traction Rating
A traction rating can also be found on the sidewall of all modern tires. It can be represented as AA, A, B or C. This is a rating of a tire's traction when tested for straight-line braking on a wet surface. For this rating, AA signifies the best traction performance and C indicates the worst.
 
Temperature Rating
The temperature rating refers to the ability of the tire to withstand heat under high speeds. The ratings, from best to worst, are: A, B and C.
 
Tread Wear Rating
Finally, you might find the word "TREADWEAR" on the sidewall followed by a number like 120 or 180. This is a rating of the tread's durability, as tested against an industry standard. The reference number is 100, so a tire with a tread wear rating of 200 has an 80 percent longer predicted tread life, while a rating of 80 means a predicted tread life only 80 percent as long as the industry standard.
 

Line of Fire

by Dave Eppelheimer, J.F. Sobieski Mechanical Contractors


Many people are injured or killed as a result of being in the line of fire during construction work.

  • Advanced Safety Analysis and Safety Observations show that everybody needs to pay more attention to line of fire hazards.
  • Every employee on site must be more aware about the risks of being in the line of fire.
  • Do you know that all injures associated with line of fire could be avoided by simple precautions?

What is the Line Of Fire
You put yourself in the line of fire when you place yourself, or any part of yourself in a position where you are directly exposing yourself to a hazard.
 
Examples of Line-of Fire situations:

  • Sudden release of tension or force – 
  • Hazards presented by gravity – Example: Items dropped during material handling
  • Moving machinery
  • Flying debris & projectiles
  • Opening and Closing energy control devices (electrical switches, valves, etc.)
  • Automated equipment that starts automatic (crushers, bailers, air pumps, etc
  • Moving vehicles
  • Contact with stationary hazards (hot, cold, chemicals, etc)

Construction workers are exposed to a wider variety of hazards and face a greater risk of work related injury or fatality than employees in any other industry.
In order not to be in the LINE OF FIRE or put somebody there, you MUST be aware of the constantly changing work environment around you.
 
Construction project statistical trends show that a major number of injuries relate to hand and finger injuries. These are nearly all Line of Fire incidents.
 
Ask yourself:
Who is responsible for looking after hazards?
Each workplace contains its own hazards, which may seriously injure you and your co-workers.

  • What can go wrong?
  • What are the consequences?
  • How can I prevent it from happening?

Please be aware of Line of Fire hazards not only on the job but also when off duty.

  • Identify risks and hazards before commencing any job.
  • Use proper tools and equipment and make sure they are properly maintained.
  • Ensure nobody is beneath an overhead work area or Line of Fire.

What can workers do to keep themselves and co-workers out of the Line of Fire?

  • Be alert and learn to recognize Line of Fire hazards at work; 
  • Report any hazard or dangerous situation at work to the supervisor;
  • Follow the rules and use safe work practices; 
  • Use proper personal protective equipment; 
  • Don’t be afraid to ask questions about anything you do not understand. 

No perfect temperature for your water heater



by Brian C. Martinenza, Jr., Service Unlimited





As winter approaches and the outdoor temperatures start to drop so does the groundwater temperature. At some point in the next month, many of you will go down the basement and turn the red knob on the water heater the “W” mark the last homeowner so kindly left for you indicating the “best” winter setting. But is this truly the best setting for your family?







What’s a safe temperature for water?



On the side of most water heaters you may find a warning that says water temperatures of 125 degrees Fahrenheit can cause burns or death.  To be safe, the water coming out of the plumbing fixtures in a home shouldn’t be any hotter than 120 degrees. How fast can second and third degree burns happen at temperatures that any new water heater is capable of producing?



 



150 degree F = 1 second



140 degree F = 5 seconds



130 degree F = 25 seconds



120 degree F = 5 minutes



 



Just turning down the temperature at your water heater until you’re at a safe 120 degrees isn’t enough to solve potential scald hazards because the thermostat on a water heater isn’t designed to keep the water at a constant temperature; it’s just designed to keep the water within a certain range of temperatures. Anti-scald devices are required in all new or remodeled showers or shower-bath combos, but this does nothing to address the final temperature of the water coming out of a fixture.   Anti-scald devices only help to prevent people from getting scalded by a sudden swing in temperature while using water.  Many old shower valves don’t even have the anti-scald feature, if a toilet would flush while someone was taking a shower the pressure on the cold water line would drop, quickly increasing the water temperature at the shower. Sound familiar?







Lower Temperatures Allow Bacteria Growth



It seems as though the solution to help prevent accidental scalding would be to turn down the temperature at the water heater to say, 115 degrees, but lower temperatures actually create other problems. At temperatures below 135 to 140, Legionella bacteria, which is responsible for Legionnaires’ Disease, can survive and even multiply in the water heater tank.  Estimates by LegionellaPrevention.org say that up to 600,000 cases of Legionnaires’ disease are misdiagnosed as pneumonia each year, because this is something that isn’t typically tested for. To help prevent bacteria growth, the ASSE recommends keeping the water in your water heater tank at about 135 – 140 degrees Fahrenheit. Of course, this creates a scalding hazard.







What’s the Answer?



To help prevent bacteria growth and to lower the risk of scalding, have a plumber install a tempering valve and crank up the temperature at your water heater to about 135 – 140, as ASSE recommends. A tempering valve allows you to keep the water at a dangerously high, Legionella-killing temperature inside the water heater tank; yet it mixes cold water in with the hot water right at the outlet. The rest of the fixtures in your home are now protected from this dangerously hot water. A tempering valve won’t guarantee safe water temperatures 100% of the time, but it will surely keep you safer than you are today.



 



http://www.asse-plumbing.org/WaterHeaterScaldHazards.pdf

Scaffold safety

Mike Anderson, Nickle Electrical Companies 

Three weeks ago the construction community was rocked by tragedy following a scaffold collapse where three workers were killed and another worker was seriously injured when they fell from a mast climber that collapsed while being dismantled at a downtown Raleigh construction site.



Tragic events like this accident are a constant reminder of exactly how dangerous construction is. An estimated 2.3 million construction workers, or 65% of the construction industry, work on scaffolds frequently. Protecting these workers from scaffold related accidents would prevent 4,500 injuries and 50 deaths per year. The OSHA standards for scaffolding in construction are extremely detailed, so it is impossible to cover all the rules and requirements for each specific type of scaffold.  The OSHA standards for scaffolding can be found in 29 CFR 1926. Subpart L – Scaffolding.



Here are just a few things you can do to keep yourself safe while working on scaffolding:

  • Get properly trained before using a scaffold. Training must be done by a “qualified “person and includes identification of electrocution, fall and falling objects hazards and the procedures for dealing with those hazards. Training must also include the proper use of the scaffold, how to handle materials and the load capacities of the scaffold.
  • Get retrained when additional hazards present themselves due to changes at the jobsite or if the type of scaffold, fall protection or falling objects protection changes. You can also be required to receive additional training if your boss feels that your initial training was not adequately retained.
  • Before getting on a scaffold check to make sure that a “competent” person has inspected the scaffold before the work shift and that it is safe to use and in proper working order. Scaffolds can only be erected, dismantled, altered or moved under direct supervision of a “competent” person by trained personnel. If you are ever unsure regarding the safety of a scaffold check with a supervisor before use.
  • Always wear your hardhat when working on, under or around a scaffold. You should also get a good sturdy, non-skid pair of work boots and consider using tool lanyards when working on scaffolds.
  • Be mindful of coworkers working above and below you at all times, as well as others working on the scaffold. If you witness improper use on or around a scaffold you should stop what you are doing and notify a supervisor.
  • When personal fall arrest systems are required for the scaffold you will be working on, thoroughly inspect the equipment for damage and wear. Anchor the system to a safe point that won’t allow you to free fall more than six feet before stopping.

 

Here are some things you should never do while working on a scaffold:

  • Never leave anything on the scaffold at the end of your shift. This includes any building materials or tools that you may have been using on the scaffold while you were working. These items could potentially be blown off the scaffold or cause tripping hazards for the next person using the scaffold.
  • Never overload the scaffold. Part of proper training includes being informed of the maximum intended load of the scaffold you are working on as well as its load-carrying capacities. In most instances, scaffolds should be capable of supporting at least four times its maximum intended load.
  • Never use boxes or ladders to increase your work height. If you can’t reach an area you should request that your supervisor have the scaffold platform raised. Don’t use stilts unless the guardrails on the scaffold have been extended to a height that is equal to the height of the stilts.
  • Never use the scaffold if it appears that it is damaged in any way, has been tampered with or if there are components missing such as planking, guardrails, toe boards, debris nets or protective canopies. Notify a supervisor immediately to get the scaffold in proper working order and inspected by a “competent” person. Never tamper with or attempt to repair a scaffold unless you have received training in scaffold erection.
  • Never walk on scaffold planking covered in ice, snow or mud. Worn wood planking can also be extremely slippery when wet. All snow, ice, mud and other debris such as wet leaves should be thoroughly removed before using the scaffold. You should also avoid using a scaffold during adverse weather such as heavy rain, sleet, ice snow or strong winds.
  • Never climb on any portion of the scaffold frame not intended for climbing. Always use a fixed ladder, internal access stairway or built-in ladder to access the working platform. There should always be a handhold above the scaffold platform. Never climb with any materials or tools in your hand, they should be hoisted up to the scaffold separately.
Note: OSHA defines a “competent” person as “one who is capable of identifying existing and predictable hazards in the surroundings or working conditions which are unsanitary, hazardous, or dangerous to employees, and who has authorization to take prompt corrective measures to eliminate them”. A “qualified” person is “one who, by possession of a recognized degree, certificate, or professional standing, or who by extensive knowledge, training, and experience, has successfully demonstrated his/her ability to solve or resolve problems related to the subject matter, the work, or the project”.

 

Work Smart. Stay Safe.



Making OSHA irrelevant
by David Bradford, DiSabatino Construction

Making OSHA Irrelevant
“You can plan your work and leave safety out; but you can NEVER plan safety and leave the work out.”
This truism is one of my favorite sayings because it captures the fundamental importance of planning; and how critical planning is to preventing incidents and injuries.

Work that is well-planned and executed takes into account everything (or as much as possible) that could affect a successful outcome; including materials, tools, people, scheduling, communication, weather and work conditions, as well as, constantly assessing what things could possibly go wrong.

When it comes to safety planning four things are essential:
First is your ability to recognize, evaluate and fully understand the hazards associated with a task and the risks they impose on you.
Second, is your knowledge of what to use and how best to go about mitigating those hazards and risks.
Third is your skill and/or ability to act on what you know (e.g. properly don protective gear, operate test equipment, follow a lock out procedure).
Last, and most important, is your motivation to perform the first three.

Q) So where do YOU go for help in deciding how to keep safe on your job? Your Co-workers? Supervisor? Safety Resource?
A) The vast majority of employees in all industries will point to OSHA (Occupational Safety & Health Administration), the EPA (Environmental Protection Agency), DOL (Department of Labor) and other government or regulatory agencies as the principal authority for all things health and safety related. After all, OSHA was created to ensure American workers the right to a workplace free of recognized threats to their health and well-being.
However, the truth is our reliance upon OSHA to be the arbiter of all things safe is fraught with danger.

OSHA Standards are MINIMAL, not optimal Standards
OSHA should never be looked to for answers on how best to do a job safely. I wish I had a nickel for every time I’ve been asked, “So, what do we HAVE to do?” or “What does OSHA say we gotta do?” to be safe.     

Excellence in executing a job is like constructing anything of value; it begins with asking the right questions, such as, “How do the best craftsmen in the world (carpenter, electrician, pipe fitter, insulator, mechanic or painter) do this task or that task. This question seeks to identify “best practices”; not minimum acceptable standards. Best practices define how to make things work well, not simply make things that barely work at all.  Minimum standards force people to live on the edge of acceptability; the line between what is tolerable and what is not. Minimum safety standards don’t call upon us to do safety well or above minimum required specifications. This happens largely because safety specs are usually viewed as simply a cost that rarely adds value to the final product or service. How often have you heard someone ask, “What is the safest way to approach this job or do this task?” Or better yet, “What precautions would you impose upon this job if it was your son or daughter (or other loved one) that would be performing the work? What would you make them do to minimize their chance of being harmed?” Do we hold each other to that same level or standard of safety?
Text Box: “If you are constantly asking yourself the question, “How can I eliminate or control the hazards in this task I’m about to do?” you increasingly will find yourself performing your work above and beyond whatever minimum requirement OSHA or any other regulatory agency would impose upon you.”




Let’s face it, an OSHA audit can provoke lots of anxiety and stress upon employees and supervisors alike. To constantly fear and worry about whether you are always aware of and in conformance to some standard, can overwhelm the most conscientious of workers. When you’re living “on-the-edge” of conformance, you will have stress. This is where stress lives; on the edge. Thankfully, this stress and pressure to be 100% compliant is totally avoidable and unnecessary when you 1) thoroughly assess the hazards you will be facing on each and every job, and 2) take the time and steps necessary to eliminate or control your exposure to the things with the most potential for harm.  

In my experience, people who honestly conclude that OSHA standards are overkill, are overly restrictive or just plain silly, either 1) don’t have full awareness or complete understanding of the hazards to which they are exposed, or 2) lack facts or reliable information about the likelihood or degree of danger inherent in the task in front of them, or 3) knowing the risks, they are convinced they are smart and skillful enough  to control all factors that might surprise them and result in their getting hurt this one time. “Rules and regulations are written for the new guys and slow learners who haven’t been around as long or are as experienced as me,” they say.

You’ve likely heard the expression, “OSHA rules and regulations were written in blood.” That’s because every, and I mean EVERY, regulation has been written as a response to the loud and angry appeals of victims and families of victims who experienced an unnecessary death or life-altering trauma or permanent disability.

If we ever hope to eradicate injuries and occupational illnesses from the workplace, we must no longer accept working in work places that rely upon safety rules and regulations that demand conformance only to the lowest tolerable levels of safety. Rather, we must insist, and demand of each other, that we each think about, discuss, plan and take responsible precautions that actually minimize our exposure to hazards, errors, distractions and oversights that all too often get us hurt. We need to continually live and work in a world above the minimum standard.

So, do you want to make OSHA irrelevant in your day-to-day work life?
The dispute over what I have to do (because of a company or government requirement) vs. my freedom to take risks of which I am totally comfortable, must be challenged at every turn and driven out of the workplace. Thankfully, these tensions WILL instantly disappear the moment we begin asking the right questions. Instead of asking “What’s the minimum I have to do to stay out of trouble?” start asking yourself and each other, “What precautions and steps should you and I take that will ensure we don’t get hurt in some unexpected or inconceivable way.” Planning safety into your work, will make OSHA (along with its stress, fear and anxiety) inconsequential to your everyday work. When your work plans and actions are routinely performed above and beyond minimum requirements, OSHA standards become irrelevant.

As this mindset becomes ingrained in our approach to planning and executing our work, safety will inevitably become a “way of life” which, not surprisingly, will also generate efficiency, quality, and productivity into every task we undertake

Anticipate accidents
By David Eppelheimer, J.F. Sobieski
 

One of the key words in accident prevention is “anticipate”. By anticipating what could happen, it is possible to take safety steps to prevent an accident. 

One of the steps we can take is to investigate all near miss accidents. We should always be on the lookout for unsafe practices and for accidents that do not result in injury.  Injury analyses prove that, in the average case, for every mishap resulting in an injury there are many other similar accidents that cause no injuries. 

So we see that accidents do not have to result in injury. But, they are strong indications that something is wrong. If not remedied in time, they may very well result in a major lost-time injury. 
We know that accidents without personal injury, however minor they may be, occur frequently. They have the same causes as personal injury accidents, and they can be prevented in the same ways. They are expensive and add to the cost of production. Preventing these accidents is important. 

When an accidental injury does occur, unsafe practices probably had previously been committed. There probably had also been previous narrow escapes. If you stumble, fall, and sustain an injury, chances are that this was not the first time that you stumbled and fell or the first time you just stumbled. 
How many times do we have to have a narrow miss before we get the message? If we really believe in safety and want to avoid personal injury, one near miss should be enough. 

Near misses or no-injury accidents, as well as injuries, must be investigated. 

Report all accidents to your supervisor. If you do not, eventually the law of averages will catch up with you—changing that near miss into a serious injury. 

Let us try and anticipate what could happen by being aware of near misses and reporting them. In this way we all can play a big part in preventing accidents. 

SAFETY REMINDER:  Let us all do part in preventing accidents.


User Safety Notice
30 ft. / 9 m. Workman® Self-Retracting Lanyard
October 28, 2015
Dear MSA Fall Protection Customer,
MSA is issuing this User Safety Notice due to a potential safety issue involving
30 ft. / 9 m. Workman SRLs. We apologize for any inconvenience that this may
cause.
We have determined that a small percentage of Workman 30 ft. / 9 m. SRLs
manufactured from January through August of 2015 may have an improper brake
nut torque setting. This condition is not detectable when performing the normal
pre-use inspection procedure. SRLs with this condition may not arrest a user’s
fall or may not arrest it within the specified maximum arrest distance.
There have been no reports of incidents attributed to this condition, but we ask
for your immediate assistance in allowing us to replace all affected SRLs.
Please contact MSA as indicated below to schedule the replacement.
Continued use of SRLs within this date range is also possible on a temporary basis provided they pass
a one-time special inspection. They must also meet all normal inspection requirements laid out in the
user instructions. Since the long term impact of this condition could result in degradation of
performance that is not detectable by the user, it is important that you remove these units from service
sometime over the next several months, but no later than April 30, 2016. Please contact MSA if you
would like more information on this special inspection.
To identify affected 30 ft. / 9 m. Workman SRLs, check the label affixed to the unit. Affected SRLs have
one of the following “model” numbers and the “date made” is from 01-2015 through 08-2015:
10119507 10127535 10154677
10120722 10127536 10160717
10120723 10143843 10163875
10120724 10144628 10164292
10126173 10146094 10164297
10126174 10154676
No other SRL models or dates of manufacture are affected by this notice.


Replacing Affected SRLs:
To obtain replacement SRLs for affected units, please complete the attached
order form and email it to MSA Customer Service at the address indicated below.
You will need to identify on the order form the model number and serial number
of the SRLs that you are replacing. MSA will immediately ship the replacement
SRLs to you free of charge.
It is important that you immediately mark all affected SRLs “UNUSABLE” and then discard or return
them to MSA, unless they pass the special inspection. SRLs that pass the special inspection may be
used until April 30, 2016, but then must be marked “UNUSABLE” and discarded or returned to MSA.
Please cut the cable on any SRLs that are discarded to ensure that they cannot be used.
Please note that the replacement SRLs may also have a “date made” from 01-2015 through 08-2015,
but include yellow tamper evident paint on the exterior housing screw heads near the handle, as shown
in the photo below. These SRLs are new units that were factory upgraded to include a new brake
assembly and are acceptable for use.
Yellow Tamper Evident Paint
MSA Customer Service Contact Information:
As indicated above or if you have any questions, please contact MSA Customer Service using the
appropriate contact information below:
• U.S., Canada, or U.S. Territories – 1-866-672-0005 or by email at:
ProductSafetyNotices@MSAsafety.com.
• Outside the U.S., Canada, and U.S. Territories – 724-776-8626 or by email at:
LAMZonecs@MSAnet.com.
Again, we apologize for any inconvenience that this situation may cause; however, your safety and
continued satisfaction with our products is most important to us.
Best regards,
Charles J. Seibel, Jr.
Manager of Product Safety
PS15031-20


Order Form for Replacement 30 ft. / 9 m. Workman® SRLs
Please complete this form and email this form to MSA Customer Service at:
• U.S., Canada, or U.S. Territories – ProductSafetyNotices@MSAsafety.com
• Outside the U.S., Canada, and U.S. Territories – LAMZonecs@MSAnet.com
Multiple orders can be placed by submitting additional copies of this form.
Name: ____________________________________________________________________________
Shipping Address: ___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Phone: _______________________ E-Mail:_______________________________________________
Dealer that you purchased SRLs from: ___________________________________________________
Identify each of your 30 ft. / 9 m. Workman SRL that you need replaced:
Model Number Serial Number Model Number Serial Number
Please check one of the following: ______ I agree to discard the SRLs listed above, or ______ I agree
to return the SRLs listed above to MSA. If returning units, MSA will send instructions for free shipping.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MSA Use Only - Order Code: WR2 2015 Workman SRL; Return Code: WRR RE: 2015 Workman SRL
PS15031-20

User Safety Notice
50 ft. / 15 m. Workman® Self-Retracting Lanyard
October 28, 2015
Dear MSA Fall Protection Customer,
MSA is issuing this User Safety Notice due to a potential safety issue involving
50 ft. / 15 m. Workman SRLs. We apologize for any inconvenience that this may
cause.
We have determined that a small percentage of Workman 50 ft. / 15 m. SRLs
manufactured from January through August of 2015 may have an improper brake
nut torque setting. This condition is not detectable when performing the normal
pre-use inspection procedure. SRLs with this condition may not arrest a user’s
fall or may not arrest it within the specified maximum arrest distance.
There have been no reports of incidents attributed to this condition, but we ask
for your immediate assistance in allowing us to replace all affected SRLs.
Please contact MSA as indicated below to schedule the replacement.
Continued use of SRLs within this date range is also possible provided they pass a one-time special
inspection. They must also meet all normal inspection requirements laid out in the user instructions.
Please contact MSA if you would like more information on this special inspection.
To identify affected 50 ft. / 15 m. Workman SRLs, check the label affixed to the unit. Affected SRLs
have one of the following “model” numbers and the “date made” is from 01-2015 through 08-2015:
10121776 10127258 10154679
10121777 10144629 10160718
10121778 10143844 10163876
10121834 10146096 10164293
10127257 10154678
No other SRL models or dates of manufacture are affected by this notice.


Replacing Affected SRLs:
To obtain replacement SRLs for affected units, please complete the attached
order form and email it to MSA Customer Service at the address indicated below.
You will need to identify on the order form the model number and serial number
of the SRLs that you are replacing. MSA will immediately ship the replacement
SRLs to you free of charge.
It is important that you immediately mark all affected SRLs “UNUSABLE” and then discard or return
them to MSA, unless they pass the special inspection. SRLs that pass the special inspection are
acceptable for continued use. Please cut the cable on any SRLs that are discarded to ensure that they
cannot be used.
Please note that the replacement SRLs may also have a “date made” from 01-2015 through 08-2015,
but include yellow tamper evident paint on the exterior housing screw heads near the handle, as shown
in the photo below. These SRLs are new units that were factory upgraded to include a new brake
assembly and are acceptable for use.
Yellow Tamper Evident Paint
MSA Customer Service Contact Information:
As indicated above or if you have any questions, please contact MSA Customer Service using the
appropriate contact information below:
• U.S., Canada, or U.S. Territories – 1-866-672-0005 or by email at:
ProductSafetyNotices@MSAsafety.com.
• Outside the U.S., Canada, and U.S. Territories – 724-776-8626 or by email at:
LAMZonecs@MSAnet.com.
Again, we apologize for any inconvenience that this situation may cause; however, your safety and
continued satisfaction with our products is most important to us.
Best regards,
Charles J. Seibel, Jr.
Manager of Product Safety
PS15031-23

Order Form for Replacement 50 ft. / 15 m. Workman® SRLs
Please complete this form and email this form to MSA Customer Service at:
• U.S., Canada, or U.S. Territories – ProductSafetyNotices@MSAsafety.com
• Outside the U.S., Canada, and U.S. Territories – LAMZonecs@MSAnet.com
Multiple orders can be placed by submitting additional copies of this form.
Name: ____________________________________________________________________________
Shipping Address: ___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
___________________________________________________________________
Phone: _______________________ E-Mail:_______________________________________________
Dealer that you purchased SRLs from: ___________________________________________________
Identify each of your 50 ft. / 15 m. Workman SRL that you need replaced:
Model Number Serial Number Model Number Serial Number
Please check one of the following: ______ I agree to discard the SRLs listed above, or ______ I agree
to return the SRLs listed above to MSA. If returning units, MSA will send instructions for free shipping.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
MSA Use Only - Order Code: WR2 2015 Workman SRL; Return Code: WRR RE: 2015 Workman SRL
PS15031-23

A quiet bombshell: OSHA fines for workplace safety violations to rise for 1st time in 25 years

Dive Brief:

  • A "little-noticed" provision in the budget bill signed by President Obama this week raised federal U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration fines for workplace safety violations for the first time in 25 years, according to The Wall Street Journal. The measure — which brings penalties in line with inflation increases since 1990 — also requires future OSHA and state agency penalty hikes to continue to rise with inflation.

  • OSHA has not yet announced the exact increase, which could reach as much as an 80% bump. The agency must decide on the increase percentage by mid-2016. However, The Journal noted that despite the steep increase in fines, OSHA's penalties pale in comparison to those issued by other federal regulatory agencies.

  • Industry experts told The Journal they were "caught by surprise" by the provision, which would likely raise maximum penalties for the most severe violations from $70,000 to $125,000, and other serious violations from $7,000 to $12,500. They noted, however, that the maximum fines could be lower than the 80% increase after a rule-making process.

Dive Insight:

OSHA, along with just a few other federal agencies, was exempted from a 1990 measure requiring agencies to increase penalties along with inflation. Democrats in Congress have tried to get this kind of bill passed for years, but business group opposition has always kept them at bay. However, unlike lawmakers' past efforts, this new provision does not include higher penalties for violations resulting in a worker's death. 

Safety advocates welcomed the new measure, as they have criticized the lower penalties for years. Last year, the average fine for an incident resulting in a worker's death was $7,000, and then reduced to $5,050 after settlement talks, according to the AFL-CIO. 

Peg Seminario, director of safety and health for the AFL-CIO, said of the new measure, "It's progress... It’s bringing the penalties for worker-safety violations up to date."

On the other hand, some industry representatives have expressed concern with the fine increases, which they said could be a burden on small businesses. 

"This has the potential to have a pretty significant impact," said Rob Matuga, of the National Association of Home Builders. "Our housing industry is just making a comeback."

Attention on workplace safety concerns has ramped up recently, as federal and state agencies are cracking down on employers putting their workers in danger. The construction industry would see a huge impact as the result of this kind of OSHA penalty increase, as construction fatalities accounted for 20.6% of all total private industry fatalities last year, according to the BLS. Some safety experts have also blamed the increase in the percentage of Latino construction worker fatalities partly on the lack of severe OSHA penalties deterring dangerous job site practices.

Agreement With U.S. Department of Justice Gives Bite to OSHA’s Bark in Criminal Cases
Excerpt from EHS Today
December 17, 2015

OSHA has been predicting this and announced a memo of understanding had been written between OSHA and DOJ. From the looks of things, it is active right now.
OSHA and the U.S. Department of Justice put employers on notice on Dec. 17 that serious jail time could be in their future if employees die as a result of violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and other Department of Labor statutes.
At first glance, the case was no different than many other OSHA fatality investigations. An employee suffered a fatal fall, the employer claimed he had issued fall protection to his employees and this particular employee, for whatever reason, wasn’t wearing it when he fell.
OSHA cited Jenkintown, Pa.-based James J. McCullagh Roofing Inc. for 10 alleged safety violations – including three willful violations – following its investigation of the fatal June 2013 accident in which the worker fell 45 feet while performing roofing repairs on a church in Philadelphia.
“This tragic accident could have been prevented had the company provided the proper fall protection for employees,” Jean Kulp, acting director of OSHA’s Philadelphia Area Office, said at the time. “It’s vital that these hazards be corrected to protect employees in the future.”
The willful violations were due to a lack of fall protection for employees performing roofing work as high as 45 feet from the ground level and a lack of fall protection for employees working from a roof bracket scaffold. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law’s requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.
The company contested the citations and the case remains pending before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission. That’s not the end of the story, however.
Employers like McCullagh Roofing rarely face criminal charges for workplace health and safety violations, even when employees are killed. As Deborah Harris, chief of the Environmental Crimes Section of the Department of Justice noted in a press call today, “Most [of these crimes] are misdemeanors with a maximum six month sentence.” Already overburdened U.S. Attorneys do not want to spend time on those cases, she added.
However, a new memorandum of understanding between the DOJ and OSHA puts some bite into the bark of criminal charges. The MOU moves some statutes – the Occupational Safety and Health Act, the Mine Safety and Health Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA) – into DOJ’s Environment and Natural Resource Division’s Environmental Crimes Section, and the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division and the U.S. Attorney’s offices will work with OSHA, MSHA and the Department of Labor's Wage and Hour Division to investigate and prosecute worker endangerment violations.
That means, said OSHA Administrator Dr. David Michaels, that employers like McCullagh now face prison terms of 25 years instead of 6 months if convicted of crimes that contribute to the deaths of employees.
‘Low-Road Employers’
“On an average day in America, 13 workers die on the job, thousands are injured and 150 succumb to diseases they obtained from exposure to carcinogens and other toxic and hazardous substances while they worked,” said Deputy Attorney General Sally Quillian Yates. “Given the troubling statistics on workplace deaths and injuries, the Department of Justice is redoubling its efforts to hold accountable those who unlawfully jeopardize workers’ health and safety.”
Yates today sent a letter to all 93 U.S. Attorneys across the country, urging federal prosecutors to work with the
Environmental Crimes Section in pursuing worker endangerment violations. The worker safety statutes generally
provide only for misdemeanor penalties. However, prosecutors now have been encouraged to consider utilizing Title
18 and environmental offenses, which often occur in conjunction with worker safety crimes, to enhance penalties
and increase deterrence.
As OSHA Administrator Dr. David Michaels noted on the same press call, “strong criminal prosecution is a powerful
tool” when dealing with what he called “low-road employers.”
Roofing company owner James J. McCullagh was charged in June with four counts of making false statements, one
count of obstruction of justice and one count of willfully violating an OSHA regulation causing death to an employee.
On Dec. 9, he pleaded guilty to all charges.
“I would like to thank the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Labor’s Office of Inspector General for
all their hard work on this case,” said Michaels, who cited the case on the press call as an example of the types of
cases the agency would like to pursue via the new MOU. “No penalty can bring back the life of this employee, but
the outcome in this case will send a clear message that when employers blatantly and willfully ignore worker safety
and health responsibilities, resulting in death or serious injury to workers, or lie to or obstruct OSHA investigators,
we will pursue enforcement to the fullest extent of the law, including criminal prosecution.”
According to the original indictment, McCullagh attempted to cover up his failure to provide fall protection by falsely
stating, on four occasions, that he had provided fall protection equipment, including safety harnesses, to his
employees. McCullagh told an OSHA compliance officer that his employees had been wearing safety harnesses tied
off to an anchor point when he saw them earlier in the day prior to the fall. McCullagh knew that he had not provided
fall protection to his employees and none of his employees had safety harnesses or any other form of fall protection.
McCullagh also directed other employees to falsely state that they had fall protection, including safety harnesses, on
the day of the fall.
He faces a maximum sentence of 25 years in prison, three years of supervised release, $1.5 million in fines and a
$510 special assessment for the criminal conviction.

Narrow frame scaffolds
Dave Hatfield, Bancroft Construction

Narrow frame scaffolds, also known as Baker/Perry style scaffolds, are among the most popular pieces of construction equipment. Due to their versatility many contractors use them instead of ladders because they allow workers to maintain their balance and work more easily from the platform.

Employers must ensure that workers have been effectively trained in the following:

• Not to stand on the guardrail or use any components of the scaffold or other items (e.g., stepladders, buckets, boxes, barrels, etc.) inside the scaffold to gain additional standing height.
• Not to try to pull yourself from one location to another while standing on the platform.
• Not to use a scaffold if it is incomplete, broken or has missing or ill-fitting parts which need replacement. Contact your employer immediately.
• Not to move the scaffold with worker(s) on the scaffold when:
   −−The worker(s) on the scaffold is unaware of the move and/or the surface under the scaffold is not within 3 degrees of level and free of pits, holes or obstructions.
   −−The worker is on any part of the scaffold which extends outward beyond the wheels, casters, or other supports.
   −−Manual force is not being applied as close to the base as practicable. Manual force must be applied not more than 5 feet above the supporting surface (1926.452(w)(4)).

Below are the four safety articles from JJ Keller that include
updates on construction regulatory, environmental, workplace safety and hazmat
transportation.

December 2015 HazMat Transportation Report.pdf

January 2016 Construction Regulatory Update.pdf

January 2016 Environmental Alert.pdf

January 2016 Workplace Safety Advisor.pdf

Slip, trips & falls
By David Eppelheimer, J.F. Sobieski Mechanical

Thousands of Americans die every year from slips, trips and falls at work. There are different types of falls that can happen while you’re on the job – and what you can do to prevent them before you get hurt! 
Types of falls:
·      Same-level falls: These happen on the same level and include slip and falls, trip and falls, step and falls
 ·     Elevated falls: These are falls from heights, like ladders, platforms or stairs n Same-level fall prevention:
·      Good housekeeping: A clean workplace is a safer workplace
·      Spills: Rope them off, clean them up, and alert your co-workers and supervisor
·      Cords: Always use cable covers or tape to prevent co-workers from tripping over cords
·      Behavior: Don’t rush, be aware of your surroundings, cut down on distractions, don’t carry too much at once, and use handrails
·      Do not work in dimly lit areas – instead, change light bulbs, use a flashlight or alert a supervisor
·      Make sure your shoes are in good condition and tightly tied every shift
·      Remember the Four Fs: Fix it, Flag it, Forewarn and Find n Elevated falls:
·      Be careful when working at heights
·      Falls from ladders are very common, so use them carefully
·      Choose the right ladder and climb it correctly: Keep rungs at the arch of your foot as you climb, and grasp the side rails with your hands, not the rungs
·      When using a ladder, don’t reach too far to the right or left – it could upset your balance and make you fall
·      Wear the proper fall protection if working more than a few feet or more above the ground, like fall arrest protection, safety nets and guardrails
·      Guardrails must be 42 inches higher than the working surface
·      Safety nets and fall arrest protection should keep you from free falling more than six feet
Remember:
·      Falls, from any level, can lead to sprains, strains, broken bones, busted backs and even death
·      You can prevent falls at work by: Adjusting your behavior, keeping the workplace clean, wearing fall protection and using equipment – like ladders – safely
·      The Four Fs: Fix it, Flag it, Forewarn and Find
COMMON HAZARDS:
1. Contaminants on the Floor - Includes water, oil, and grease.
2. Poor Drainage - Pipes and drains.
3. Indoor Walking Surface Irregularities - Uneven floor surfaces.
4. Outdoor Walking Surface Irregularities - Holes, rocks, and debris.
5. Weather Conditions: - Ice and Snow
6. Poor Lighting
7. Stairs and Handrails
8. Ladders
9. Trip Hazards: Clutter - Includes hoses, wires and cables.
10. Improper Use of Floor Mats and Runners –
Prevent slips, trips, and falls by wearing slip resistant shoes, clean and maintain work space, use barriers or other indicators to prevent falls.

FACT SHEET
U.S. Department of Labor
Inflation Adjustment Act Interim Final Rules
On November 2, 2015 Congress passed the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015 (2015 Inflation Adjustment Act) – as part of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2015. The new law directs agencies to adjust their civil monetary penalties for inflation every year.

Congress often adds penalties to laws to encourage greater compliance. These penalties, however, are less effective when they haven’t been raised for decades to keep up with inflation. Recognizing this, Congress passed a law in 1990 directing agencies to adjust their civil monetary penalties to keep up with inflation, defining a civil monetary penalty as a penalty for a specific amount or maximum amount set by Federal law that is assessed or enforced by a Federal agency.

But a low cap on these increases together with complicated rounding rules kept many penalties from accomplishing Congress’s stated goal of keeping up with inflation over time. Furthermore, some agencies, such as the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, were exempt from the 1990 law, so the agency’s penalties have not increased since 1990. That is why Congress passed the Inflation Adjustment Act in 2015 to begin annually adjusting penalties using a more straightforward method than the 1990 law.

The new law directs each agency across the federal government to determine the last time their penalties were increased (other than under the prior inflation act) and to publish interim final rules to adjust their penalties for inflation from that date. The amount of the increase may not exceed 150% of the existing penalty amount. The law provides that the rules should be published no later than July 1, 2016.

The Department of Labor published two interim final rules to adjust its penalties for inflation:

  1. One DOL-only rule covering the vast majority of penalties assessed by the Department’s Employee Benefits Security Administration, Mine Safety & Health Administration, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, Office of Workers’ Compensation Programs, and Wage and Hour Division; and
  2. A second rule jointly with the Department of Homeland Security to adjust the penalties associated with the H-2B temporary guest worker program.

These rules apply the 2015 Inflation Adjustment Act’s clear formula on how to determine the proper adjustment for each penalty. The rules are also informed by further guidance released by the Office of Management and Budget to ensure uniform implementation of these penalties across agencies.

The rules published under the 2015 Inflation Adjustment Act will modernize some penalties that have long lost ground to inflation:

  •  OSHA’s penalties – which have not been raised since 1990 – will increase by 78%, with its top penalty for serious violations rising from $7,000 to $12,471 and its top penalty for willful or repeated violations rising from $70,000 to $124,709.
  •   OWCP’s penalty for failure to report termination of payments made under the Longshore and Harbor Workers’ Compensation Act has only increased $10 since 1927, and will rise from $110 to $275.
  •   WHD’s penalty for willful violations of the minimum wage and overtime provisions of the Fair Labor Standards Act will rise from $1,100 to $1,894.
These penalty increases will also deter violations, which will provide a significant benefit not only for workers but also for responsible employers who will have a more level playing field when competing with employers who are not following the law.

The new civil penalty amounts are applicable only to civil penalties assessed by the Department after August 1, 2016, whose associated violations occurred after November 2, 2015, the date of enactment of the Inflation Adjustment Act.

More information on the individual penalty adjustments can be found on a chart available at https://www.dol.gov/sites/default/files/2016-inflation-penalty-chart.pdf
Practicing good housekeeping is good for safety
by David Eppelheimer, J.F. Sobieski


A GOOD WAY TO MAKE YOUR JOB EASIER
Have you ever thought of ways to make your job easier? Perhaps you've wondered if someone could come up with better tools and equipment and simplified construction methods. But, there is another way too - one that not only makes a job easier, but safer - practicing good housekeeping.  

POOR HOUSEKEEPING CAUSES MANY ACCIDENTS
A nail in a scrapped two-by-four goes through a shoe and punctures a foot. A pile of trash catches fire. A cluttered walkway causes an employee to trip and fall. All these accidents are caused by poor housekeeping.  

RESULTS CAN RANGE FROM A SLIGHT CUT TO A LOST LIFE
Some poor housekeeping accidents don't amount to much. A small cut, a scuffed elbow or a bruised leg. Others can have disastrous results involving the loss of life and property. 

ONCE-A-DAY OR ONCE-A-WEEK CLEANUP IS NOT ENOUGH
Housekeeping is a continuing process in which everyone must participate throughout the work day. Let's see how we can eliminate some of the most common housekeeping problems that can cause accidents on the job. 

NAILS: Stepping on a nail can cause a serious injury. Pull all nails from scrap lumber. Then throw the scrap in trash containers or pile it neatly where it won't be in the way.  

METAL STRAPS AND BANDS: How many times have you gotten tangled up in this stuff? After removing straps or bands, pick them up immediately and put them in a trash container. It's easy to trip on banding if it is left lying around on the job. This goes for other scrap, too.  
Have you ever stepped on a pipe, bolt, dowel, conduit, or small piece of reinforcing steel? You probably twisted your ankle or lost your balance temporarily. Keep round scrap material out of the way. Put it in the trash. Or, if it's going to be used, store it in a safe location.  

EXTENSION CORDS: Another tripping hazard. If you must run an extension cord across the walkway, hang it from the ceiling where it won't cause anyone to trip. But, hang it high enough, so you won't hang the person who walks under it.  

FOOD RUBBISH: Lunch bags and other food rubbish not only cause trips and falls, but fires also. Put them in trash cans after you have finished eating. Don't leave them around to clutter up the job or to attract animals and insects. It's especially dangerous to leave bottles lying around. They're not only a tripping hazard, but can break and cut someone.  

SPECIAL CONTAINERS: Some items should be stored in separate trash containers. These include oily or solvent-soaked rags and empty cans that contain flammable liquids, such as paint, thinner, and glue. Remember to keep these trash containers covered. 

STORAGE AREAS: There are numerous storage areas throughout the job. Keep these neat. This not only is safer, but enables you to find what you want more quickly and to get it more easily. 

SLIPPING HAZARDS: During the course of a job, it is almost impossible not to have grease or tar on the floors of a new building, or on the job site. And, naturally, someone can slip and be hurt. So clean up slipping hazards immediately. This also goes for ice during cold weather. 

SAFE HOUSEKEEPING PAYS OFF  It's easier to work in a clean area than in a cluttered junk pile. And, as we have been stressing, a clean job means a safer job. Good housekeeping is up to each one of us.

GFCI Receptacles Stand the Test of Time for Optimal Protection and End-of-Life (EOL) Action

Article by Leviton

As lauded in a 2008 Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC) paper, “GFCIs have contributed significantly to the reduction of electrocution and severe electric shock incidents since their introduction in the early 1970s1” This notable safety achievement can be attributed to decades of research, innovation, communication and cooperation on the part of GFCI manufacturers, regulatory agencies, consumer product watchdogs and electrical industry professionals.

Instrumental in the evolution of GFCI safety was the role of Underwriters Laboratories (UL) in responding to an April 20, 2001 request from CPSC that “major upgrades to the GFCI standard are needed. These upgrades should include requirements to address resistance to electrical surges, resistance to effects of wet locations, miswiring, and provisions to require that GFCIs cannot be reset if the GFCI is not operable2”. This communication came on the heels of a UL convened meeting of the Standards Technical Panel (STP) for GFCIs on March 14-15, 2001. At that meeting, the results of a survey of the field performance of GFCIs sponsored by the National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) were discussed along with a number of proposals for revisions of the requirements applicable to GFCIs.

Added to this momentum was the fact that research indicated many GFCI users were not adhering to industry recommendations to test their GFCIs monthly. The result was a revision to UL 943 Standard so that effective on January 1, 2003 the following requirements were among those specified:
1) expansion of surge test requirements
2) new requirements for moisture and corrosion, and
3) new requirements for reverse line-load miswire test.

This revision aimed to ensure that GFCIs were as robust as possible.

Three years later, in a continuing effort to enhance the safety of GFCIs, UL issued new requirements on GFCI functionality to address the important safety issue of Line-Load Reversal Indication during the installation process of GFCI receptacles. Effective July 28, 2006, this revision focused on a potentially hazardous situation relating to instances where the GFCI receptacle face was live and unprotected after installation.

The 2006 UL 943 Standard also brought to the forefront the issue of GFCI End of Life (EOL). This standard defined EOL and helped safeguard that GFCI receptacles which are supplying power are also supplying GFCI protection. It is important to note that this EOL initiative was directed at receptacles only. Also of note is that EOL at this time was dependent upon users testing the device to get it to EOL status. Issues with users regularly testing their devices was a concern and this paved the way for the 2015 revision requiring auto-monitoring which we will review next.

2006 UL 943 Standard

Paragraphs

General Subject and Comment

2.8.1

Definition of GFCI Receptacle End of Life. No action required to determine compliance.

19.7, 37C.1, 37C.2

A receptacle type GFCI with line and load terminals, when powered through its load terminals, is not to be able to be reset and supply power to the receptacle face or line terminals.  Requires performing reverse line-load miswire test, Section 37C of UL 943.

20.4.1, 37F

GFCI receptacle construction and performance is to be reviewed to determine that product incorporates visual, audible means or both, or renders itself incapable of delivering power when internal test is performed in accordance with GFCI Receptacle End of Life Test, Section 37F.

39.1.1.1

Receptacle type GFCI Installation instructions will need to be reviewed to determine that an end of life explanation and reverse line load miswire condition is included with revised product.

Current Standards
The latest 2015 UL 943 Standard revision effective June 29, 2015 continues the safety evolution by requiring all GFCI manufacturers - Receptacle and Circuit Breaker - to produce GFCIs with an auto-monitoring (self-test) feature that automatically conducts a periodic internal test to confirm the GFCI is able to respond to a ground fault. If a problem is detected during the self-test, the GFCI must automatically trip and deny power or provide a visual and/or audible indication. So now all GFCIs have to test themselves - in essence forcing a bad GFCI to declare itself bad to the end user rather than the end user having to push to test the device to get it into the EOL state.

Although most exceptions given to GFCI circuit breakers in 2006 for meeting EOL requirements were taken away with this revision, there are still significant ones that remain. These exceptions pertain specifically to silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCR) and solenoids, two components common to all tripping mechanisms. These components may be compromised in GFCI circuit breakers and therefore allow the GFCI circuit breaker to potentially remain energized even in an EOL event. Although these components may also be compromised in GFCI receptacles, the significant difference is that GFCI receptacles are required to address this failure. Because of this requirement, GFCI receptacles offer an added layer of protection that GFCI circuit breakers are not required to offer.

2015 UL 943 Standard

Paragraphs

General Subject and Comment

New clauses 5.14.6, 5.14.7, 6.23A, 7.37, 7.38, 8.17

Adds requirement to repeat the reverse line-load miswire test on a receptacle GFCI after it has been installed correctly, removed, and reinstalled in a miswired condition. 

 

Currently certified GFCI receptacles will need to be reviewed and tested for compliance with the new requirements.  Compliance may require design modifications to currently certified GFCI receptacles.

Revised clauses 3.9, 5.15.5; Revised section 6.26; New sections 5.16 and 6.30

Extends end of life requirements to all permanently connected GFCIs. 

 

Also requires all permanently connected GFCIs to have an auto-monitoring function in addition to the manual test button.

Currently certified permanently connected GFCIs will need to be reviewed and tested for compliance with the new requirements.  Compliance may require design modifications to currently certified permanently connected GFCIs.

Circling back to where we started it is clear that GFCIs help save lives and are essential in any electrical system. However it is concerning that due to UL exceptions, if either the SCR or solenoid fail in a GFCI circuit breaker the end-user may still be able to reset the breaker and unknowingly NOT be protected from ground fault shock or electrocution. A UL certified GFCI receptacle is your assurance of protection in the event of a failed SCR or solenoid.

  1. http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Ground-Fault-Circuit-Interrupters/
  2. http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Regulations-Laws--Standards/Voluntary-Standards/Topics/Ground-Fault-Circuit-Interrupters/   August 14, 2001 correspondence

Article submitted by:

Bill Grande
Senior Director of Product Marketing Management, Leviton

Adam Kevelos
Director of Engineering, Residential, Leviton

For additional information, visit leviton.com/eol

M E M O

To:       Corporate Partners and Law Enforcement Agencies

Date:   July 18, 2016

Re:       Bicycle Safety – AUGUST 2016

Summer is here! In warmer summer months, more people are outside for exercise, recreation, or to run errands. Our focus in August is Bicycle Safety. There have been two (2) fatalities of bicyclists this year in Delaware. This is two, too many.

Consider these national statistics:

88% of the bicyclists killed and 80% of those injured were male

48% of bicyclist deaths occurred between 4 p.m. and midnight

24% of those killed while riding bicycles were 45 to 54 years old

9% of bicyclist fatalities and 20% of injuries occurred among children under 16

24% of bicyclist killed had BACs of .08 g/dl. or higher

37% of fatal crashes involved a driver or bicyclist who had been drinking

(Source: NHTSA: http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles)

 Bicycle safety isn’t just for kids! All riders should be educated about their bicycle as well as road safety. Before you get on a bicycle, consider these tips

Protect your head. Wear a (properly fitted) helmet.

2.       Assure bicycle readiness. Ensure proper size and function of bicycle.

3.       Ride wisely. Learn and follow the rules of the road.

4.       Be predictable. Act like a driver of a vehicle.

5.       Be visible. See and be seen at all times.

6.       “Drive” with care. Share the road.

7.       Stay focused. Stay alert.

(Source: NHTSA: http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles)

Digital Links

http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles

http://bikeleague.org/content/smart-cycling-tips-0



Traffic Safety News

 

 

 

August’s Focus is Bicycle Safety

Summer is here! In warmer summer months, more people are outside for exercise, recreation, or to run errands. Our focus in August is Bicycle Safety. There have been two (2) fatalities of bicyclists this year in Delaware. This is two, too many.

 

Consider these national statistics:

88% of the bicyclists killed and 80% of those injured were male

48% of bicyclist deaths occurred between 4 p.m. and midnight

24% of those killed while riding bicycles were 45 to 54 years old

9% of bicyclist fatalities and 20% of injuries occurred among children under 16

24% of bicyclist killed had BACs of .08 g/dl. or higher

37% of fatal crashes involved a driver or bicyclist who had been drinking

(Source: NHTSA: http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles)

 

Bicycle safety isn’t just for kids! All riders should be educated about their bicycle as well as road safety. Before you get on a bicycle, consider these tips:

 

1.       Protect your head. Wear a (properly fitted) helmet.

2.       Assure bicycle readiness. Ensure proper size and function of bicycle.

3.       Ride wisely. Learn and follow the rules of the road.

4.       Be predictable. Act like a driver of a vehicle.

5.       Be visible. See and be seen at all times.

6.       “Drive” with care. Share the road.

7.       Stay focused. Stay alert.

(Source: NHTSA: http://www.nhtsa.gov/Bicycles)

 

                   

              

 

 

TVA Operations
 
Operating Experience Communication
 
Power Portable Gasoline Generators Recalled  - 09/14/2016
 
 
Purpose This OE communication is being shared to ensure recalled Power Portable Generators by J.D. North America are removed from service. 
 
Background J.D. North America is issuing a recall of all Power Portable Gasoline Generators due to fuel tanks leaking, which can cause explosion, fire and burn hazards.       Findings  J.D. North America has received 21 reports of fuel leakage.  No injuries or property damage have been reported.
 
REQUIRED ACTIONS  Each site is to review this OE for awareness and site application.   Users identifying equipment affected by this recall must inform their supervisors immediately and tag the equipment defective.    Identify all generators affected by this recall and remove from service immediately.  Tag generators to ensure they are not returned to service.  Affected model numbers are listed below.   Contact J.D. North America to schedule a free fuel tank replacement, including installation.
 
Affected Model Numbers
 Model Number Rated UPC Serial Number APGG6000 6,000 watts 8 4676600055 3 JD29014S18035 APGG7500 7,500 watts 8 4676600056 0 JD42014S16027 - JD42014T210606
  The model number is located on both sides of the unit.  The UPC code and serial number can be found on a silver plate on the upper right handside of the back side panel.  Contact J.D. North America toll-free at (844) 287-4655 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. ET Monday through Friday by email at apggrecall@jdna.com, or online at www.allpoweramerica.com and click on the APGG Recall link for more information.
 
 Click Here for Flyer
3M Fall Protection 3833 SALA Way Red Wing, MN 55066 800 328 6146

SAFETY RECALL NOTICE – ZORBITTM ENERGY ABSORBER (Note: recall limited to lot #2101506 through 2464624 only)

The ZorbitTM Energy Absorber is used with horizontal lifeline systems to limit fall arrest forces on the worker in the event of a fall. 
3M Fall Protection (formerly Capital Safety) has identified a production issue with its Zorbit Energy Absorbers that creates a risk of serious injury or death for a user in the event of a fall from height. 
Although there have been no reported accidents or injuries associated with this issue, 3M Fall Protection is voluntarily recalling a limited lot range of this product and will replace affected energy absorbers free of charge. 
This Notice applies only to Zorbit Energy Absorbers with lot codes between 2101506 and 2464624 manufactured between March and August 2015. Zorbits with other lot codes are not affected by this notice and are safe to use. The location of the lot code on the Zorbit is shown by the red arrow in the photograph. 
The part number for the affected Zorbit Energy Absorber is 7401013. This part can be sold individually or as part of a system. Systems that use the Zorbit include:
• Sayfline™ Permanent Multi-Span Horizontal Lifeline System • SecuraSpan™  I-Beam Horizontal Lifeline System • SecuraSpan  Pour-in-Place Horizontal Lifeline System
End-users: Before next use of your horizontal lifeline system, you must inspect the system to determine if you have an affected Zorbit (as described above). If you find an affected Zorbit in your system, please remove the Zorbit and lock the system out and use alternative fall protection.  Then contact our Customer Service department at 800-328-6146 (prompt #2012) or email ZORBITSNA@mmm.com for a replacement Zorbit Retrofit Kit #7401022 that will be shipped to you free of charge within 24 hours.  (To obtain a copy of the Retrofit IFU 5905019, please scan the attached bar code or enter this URL into your browser: http://capitalsafety.webdamdb.com/#asset/44663738). When you receive the replacement Zorbit Retrofit Kit, please note and follow the instructions for returning your affected Zorbits using the pre-paid mailing box.
Distributors: Upon receipt of this notice, please contact our Customer Service department at 800-328-6146 (prompt #2012) or email ZORBITSNA@mmm.com to obtain a listing of parts and systems that were sold to you with the affected lot numbers. If you have any of the affected Zorbits in stock, you should return the Zorbits to 3M Fall Protection for replacements. Contact our Customer Service department at 800-328-6146 (ext. 2012) or email ZORBITSNA@mmm.com to obtain a “QA” number to return the unit to 3M Fall Protection.
Note to Distributors: Please forward this Recall Notice to any of your customers who have purchased affected Zorbits from you and provide any assistance requested by your customers to complete the recall process.  
3M Fall Protection will post this Notice at www.capitalsafety.com.  Please direct any additional questions you may have to Customer Service department at 800-328-6146 (ext. 2012) or you can email your inquiry directly to ZORBITSNA@mmm.com. 
October 12, 2016

Trade Release

Department of Labor, United States of America

 


 

U.S. Department of Labor
Occupational Safety and Health Administration
Office of Communications
Washington, D.C.
www.osha.gov

For Immediate Release
October 18, 2016
Contact: Office of Communications
Phone: 202-693-1999

 

OSHA releases updated recommended practices to encourage workplace safety and health programs

WASHINGTON – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration today released a set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs to help employers establish a methodical approach to improving safety and health in their workplaces.

The recommendations update OSHA’s 1989 guidelines to reflect changes in the economy, workplaces, and evolving safety and health issues. The recommendations feature a new, easier-to-use format and should be particularly helpful to small- and medium-sized businesses. Also new is a section on multi-employer workplaces and a greater emphasis on continuous improvement. Supporting tools and resources are included.

The programs are not prescriptive; they are built around a core set of business processes that can be implemented to suit a particular workplace in any industry. OSHA has seen them successfully implemented in manufacturing, construction, health care, technology, retail, services, higher education, and government.

Key principles include: leadership from the top to send a message that safety and health is critical to the business operations; worker participation in finding solutions; and a systematic approach to find and fix hazards.

“Since OSHA’s original guidelines were published more than 25 years ago, employers and employees have gained a lot of experience in how to use safety and health programs to systematically prevent injuries and illnesses in the workplace,” said Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels. “We know that working together to implement these programs will help prevent injuries and illnesses, and also make businesses more sustainable.”

The OSHA recommendations include seven core elements for a safety and health program: management leadership; worker participation; hazard identification and assessment; hazard prevention and control; education and training; program evaluation and improvement; and communication and coordination for host employers, contractors and staffing agencies.

Dr. Michaels released the new document today at the National Safety Council Congress in Anaheim, Calif. In his remarks, he asked business groups and safety and health professionals to help spread the word through a campaign that encourages creation of a safety and health program using OSHA or other program recommendations that may be more appropriate to their businesses.

The recommendations are advisory only and do not create any new legal obligations or alter existing obligations created by OSHA standards or regulations.

Under the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, employers are responsible for providing safe and healthful workplaces for their employees. OSHA’s role is to ensure these conditions for America’s working men and women by setting and enforcing standards, and providing training, education and assistance. For more information, visit www.osha.gov.

U.S. Department of Labor news materials are accessible at http://www.dol.gov. The department’s Reasonable Accommodation Resource Center converts departmental information and documents into alternative formats, which include Braille and large print. For alternative format requests, please contact the department at (202) 693-7828 (voice) or (800) 877-8339 (federal relay).

 

 


Extending the stay on OSHA NOTICE
 
 In its Order of October 14, 2016, the Court directed Defendants to advise whether they will
extend the stay of the Recordkeeping Rule’s anti-retaliation provision until December 1, 2016. 
ECF No. 32.  Defendants affirm that they will extend the stay until December 1, 2106.  They have
notified regional administrators of this extension through the attached memorandum.
Dated: October 18, 2016    Respectfully submitted,
 
BENJAMIN C. MIZER Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General
Record keeping until December 1, 2016

Click HERE to see PDF Document
We recently shared the news of a contractor fatality that occurred at the Chapman Ranch Wind project in the Corpus Christi, Texas area. – On Friday afternoon, Oct. 14, a contractor worker sustained severe injuries while unloading equipment from a trailer. – It is unclear exactly what occurred during the unloading process but somehow  the worker fell from the trailer deck and steel bracing landed on top of him pinning him to the ground. – Tragically, the worker passed away from his injuries on October 16th. – Enbridge has been working very closely with the EPC Contractor to ensure the worker’s immediate family and co-workers are being supported and  a thorough investigation is being conducted.

Click HERE for the full article.

OSHA recently released Recommended Practices for Safety and Health Programs in ConstructionThe recommended practices are flexible and can be adjusted to fit small and large construction companies handling short-term or multi-year projects. Working with employees to implement a program offers benefits including improvements in production and quality; greater employee morale; improved employee recruiting and retention; and a more favorable image and reputation among customers, suppliers and the community.

 

OSHA also initiated a Campaign for Safety & Health Programs in October to encourage all workplaces to adopt a Safety and Health Program, such as OSHA’s recommended practices and other programs that include management leadership, worker participation, and a systematic approach to finding and fixing hazards.  More resources are available on the website and you may also sign-on as a campaign co-sponsor

 

We need your help getting these tools out, especially to small- and medium- sized contractors.  Please share this information through your networks and on social media.

 

Thanks for your support.

 

Save the date- just announced! The National Safety Stand-Down to Prevent Falls in Construction is May 8-12, 2017. Check out how to conduct a safety stand-down and how to sign up for events at:  www.osha.gov/stopfallsstanddown

The information contained in this email message is privileged and confidential and is intended only for the use of the individual or entity named above who has been specifically authorized to receive it. If the reader is not the recipient, you are hereby notified that any dissemination, distribution or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have received this communication in error, please notify us immediately by telephone and return all information to the address shown above. Thank you.

NIOSH, OSHA update heat safety app for outdoor workers

Reprints
heat.jpg
Photo: NIOSH and OSHA

Washington – NIOSH and OSHA recently teamed up to update a heat safety mobile app that uses temperature and humidity to measure heat index values.

The redesigned app is intended to be a resource for outdoor workers exposed to heat on the job.

“With the hot summer months on our doorstep, this app is a valuable tool for employers and workers to help prevent heat-related illnesses,” NIOSH Director John Howard said in a June 7 press release. “In many cases, workers rely on their employers to provide opportunities for taking rest breaks and drinking water. This app puts lifesaving information at the fingertips of both supervisors and workers to inform them when they need to take precautions to stay safe at the worksite.”

The free app, an updated version of OSHA’s Heat Safety Tool, uses geolocation technology to assess the current heat index and risk level, and also offers projected heat indices throughout the workday. Users receive specific recommendations for staying safe based on those levels.

According to OSHA, extreme heat exposure is the leading cause of death among weather-related hazards, prompting more than 65,000 emergency room visits annually. In 2014, 18 workers died from heat stroke or other heat-related causes.

NIOSH recommends several measures to help workers stay safe in hot conditions:

  • Limit exposure time and/or increase recovery time in cool conditions.
  • Provide an adequate supply of cool water and encourage frequent consumption.
  • Increase the number of workers per task.
  • Provide workers and supervisors with heat stress training.

The app is available for download on Apple and Android devices.

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Enforcement of OSHA's new standard regarding the PEL for respirable silica has been delayed until September 23rd. Below is directly from OSHA regarding the delay.

"The U.S. Department of Labor's Occupational Safety and Health Administration today announced a delay in enforcement of the crystalline silica standard that applies to the construction industry to conduct additional outreach and provide educational materials and guidance for employers."

"The agency has determined that additional guidance is necessary due to the unique nature of the requirements in the construction standard. Originally scheduled to begin June 23, 2017, enforcement will now begin Sept. 23, 2017."

"OSHA expects employers in the construction industry to continue to take steps either to come into compliance with the new permissible exposure limit, or to implement specific dust controls for certain operations as provided in Table 1 of the standard. Construction employers should also continue to prepare to implement the standard's other requirements, including exposure assessment, medical surveillance and employee training."

Regardless of the delay in enforcement, making sure workers are not exposed to high levels of silica remains important. To learn more about the proper PPE needed to keep employees safe click the button below.

 

 

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